Published on August 14th,2012 at 3:19 AM
By >Ike

[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.

Introduction

Both QNAP and Synology provided us with a unit from their high-end SMB NAS lineup. In this review we will be comparing both units both on hardware performance as software functionality.

Synology’s key features:

  • 205.68 MB/sec Reading, 182.66 MB/sec Writing(combined)
  • 2 LAN with Failover and Link Aggregation Support
  • Features SuperSpeed USB 3.0
  • CPU Passive Cooling Technology & System Fan Redundancy
  • Hot-swappable Hard Drive Design
  • Windows® ADS and ACL Support
  • VMware® / Citrix® / Microsoft® Hyper-V® Compliance
  • Running on Synology DiskStation Manager (DSM)

QNAP’s key features:

  • Centralized Storage and File Sharing
  • Backup Center for Business
  • NAS, iSCSI/ IP-SAN Storage Combo Solution for Server Virtualization
  • iSCSI and Virtualization Deployment
  • Feature-rich All-in-one NAS Applications Private Cloud Storage for Ease of Deployment
  • Exceptional Performance: 221.8 MB/sec Reading, 220.8 MB/sec Writing
  • SuperSpeed USB3.0, SATA 6Gb/s Supported
  • Energy-efficient & Eco-friendly

 

System specs

Hardware differences:

Synology DS412+

Intel® Atom 2.13GHz Dual-core Processor

RAM: DDRIII 1Gb

4 x 3.5” SATA 3Gb/s hard drive or 2.5” SATA, SSD hard drive

Max Capacity : 16TB (4 X 4TB HDD)

2x USB 3.0 port (Back: 2)
1x USB 2.0 port (Front)
Support USB printer, pen drive, USB hub, and USB UPS etc.

LAN : 2x Gigabit

2x eSATA port (Back)

Power button

No display

No display output

Snap-in trays

165 (H) x 203 (W) x 233 (D) mm

w/o HDD installed: 22 dB
Stand by: 19.3 dB
In operation: depends on cooling profile, 22 up to 35 dB at max.

Sleep mode: 15W
In Operation:44W
Power-off (in WOL mode): 1W

2x 92mm Cooling fan

2 Year warranty

 

QNAP TS-469 Pro

 

Intel® Atom 2.13GHz Dual-core Processor

RAM: DDRIII 1Gb

4 x 3.5” SATA 6Gb/s, SATA 3Gb/s hard drive or 2.5” SATA, SSD hard drive

Max Capacity : 16TB (4 X 4TB HDD)

2x USB 3.0 port (Back: 2)
5x USB 2.0 port (Front: 1; Back: 4)
Support USB printer, pen drive, USB hub, and USB UPS etc.

LAN : 2x Gigabit

2x eSATA port (Back)

Power button, USB One-Touch-Backup Button, Reset button

Mono-LCD display with backlight
Enter button, Select button for configuration

Reserved VGA interface + HDMI

 

Lockable trays

177 (H) x 180 (W) x 235 (D) mm

w/o HDD installed: 34.7 dB
Stand by: 34.1 dB
In operation: 36.8 dB

Sleep mode: 25W
In Operation:43W
Power-off (in WOL mode): 1W

1x 92mm Cooling fan

1 Year warranty

This is a global comparison to give the reader an instant overview about the (fairly little) technical differences between both units.

 

First impression: Synology’s DS412+

At first glance, Synology failed a bit to impress us with the built quality of this particular SMB-grade unit. After unboxing the first thing a user will notice is the fact that the DS412+ is incredibly lightweight (+- 2kg to be precise), largely due to the choice of using a PVC outer shell and trays. Not that lightness has ever been an issue; sports cars need to be light to be fast right? Being light in IT reasoning generally associated with lower grade components being used, can be a drawback for some buyers.

The lovely part however, is the way Synology’s experts finally decided mounting 2x 92mm fans to the back of this unit, making it (as I may say so) particularly silent in operation. The flat glossy plastic front panel hiding the drive bays could have done a better job hiding fingerprints and reflecting the light if it were to be made matte over the current super glossy.

Even though the DS412+ lacks the fancy LED screen & VGA input, is SSH access-only and keeps the number of additional USB & E-SATA slots limited we didn’t find any of those to be a particular negative point when keeping the <699$ MSRP in mind.

 

First impression: QNAP TS-469 Pro

When you unbox the TS-469 Pro, it’s pretty clear that his is quality craft. Except for the front bezel and LED screen this unit is almost all steel. Even the tray are steel, no expense was spared, giving it a very durable and rugged first impression.

So as I said, it’s steel, it’s heavy with almost double the weight of the DS412+, respectively 3.65Kg vs 2Kg. Partial explanation for this is the built-in power supply where Synology still opts for the external brick-type power supply.
Another part is the presence of additional IO ports. You are getting a LED display at the front, 2 extra USB 2 ports, 1 extra E-SATA port and a dedicated VGA and HDMI output to physically boot into the Linux OS (you can hook up a USB keyboard). QNAP has a dedicated RAM upgrade slot available, so no (more) need to throw away the original SODIMM, you can just simply plug another one next to it to increase its brainpower.

It’s not all a dream when this unit is powered on. Operational fan noise; this unit isn’t your average sleeping baby. Reason here is that, due to squeezing a power supply and an additional lot of IO ports into a particularly small enclosure, you are generating much more heat inside the enclose. There is simply no space to fit (or custom fit) a larger fan at the back of this unit, so the single 92mm fan has to work overtime to keep it chilled inside. And there is also a small fan located where the power supply is fitted, adding a few DB’s to the total package.

All this durability combined with the luxurious stash of connection opportunities comes with a price increase compared to the DS412+, at the time of review there is still an 150-200$ premium to be considered.

 

NAS Operating system comparison

First mention: we are running both systems on the most up2date version of their respected firmware. For Synology this is DSM v4.0, for QNAP v3.7 .

We only look at the more advanced features of both units aimed at SMB usage. Regular features like adding users, creating folders… have been left out on purpose, since every NAS unit can perform those specific actions.

 

General differences

SYNOLOGY DS412+

QNAP TS-469 Pro

Set-up wizard

Step by step guide at first boot, covering every essential feature.

Asks for RAID type at first boot.

DIY run through the menus from there on.

Software “finder” application

Available

Available

Print, media, itunes, surveillance, mail, download server/station & backup

Yes

Yes

Cooling

3 modes: cool, quiet and Low-power

2 modes, full auto (balanced) or full manual

Access to system resources

Fully visible at management interface and submenu

Spread over 3 submenus in System status tree

iSCSI, Virtual LAN, ADS/LDAP, VPN

Yes

Yes

Mobile access (iPhone/iPad/Android)

Yes

Yes

FTP (SSL/TSL)

Yes

Yes

ISO, CD, DVD, Blu-ray network sharing

Yes

Yes

SMB, NFS & AFP (Win, Mac & Linux)

Yes

Yes

Antivirus protection

Optional install

Default installed but not enabled

USB, Remote hard disk, server and NAS backup/replication

Yes

Yes

Remote cloud services, web & mobile

Yes

Yes

NetBak (Win) & Time Machine (Mac)

Yes

Yes

VMware clusters, Citrix ready & Windows Server 2008 R2 support

Yes

Yes

RADIUS Server

No

Yes

WiFi via USB compliant

No

Yes

VMware ESXi 4 and 5′s NFS certification

Only 4

Both

 

Security & protection notifications

IP Blocking

Yes, Manual entry of IP and choice to allow or block specific user/IP. Global allow or block if not in list

Yes, global allow all.  Allow or block connections from user list

SSH, Samba, Telnet, AFP, HTTP(S) or FTP specific blocking

Yes, no choice to specify protocol (all by default). User can choose set block timer after x-attempts. Includes ban expiration.

Yes, protocol specific with duration timer after user defined number of unsuccessful login attempts

System notifications (beep)

On: Start, Restart, Firmware upgrade, High temperature, System error or warning

On: Start, Restart, Firmware upgrade, High temperature, System error or warning

System notifications

By email, SMS (clickatell), push notifications (Skype/MSN Live) or paired devices.

Fully customizable advanced mode.

By email, SMS (clickatell or custom), MSN Live.
More restricted in customizability.

After power failure

Restart unit or remain off

Resume last state, remain off or power on.

Wake on LAN and/or EuP

Only WOL

Both

UPS Support

Yes

Yes

Power on/off, hibernation

Both, fully customizable

Both, fully customizable

System logs

Yes, for all types of events

Yes, for all types of events

 

Disk management

RAID options

JBOD, 0, 1, 5, 6 and 10. Multiple arrays and combinations possible. Migration support.

JBOD, 0, 1, 5, 6 and 10. Multiple arrays and combinations possible. Migration support.

LUN masking and ACL support

Yes, both

Yes, both

Virtual disk support

Yes

Yes

 

User rights management

Active directory/LDAP validation

Yes, supports local NAS or remote LDAP.

Yes, configurable: remote LDAP, remote NAS LDAP or local NAS LDAP

WEBDAV

Normal, Anonymous, HTTPS or CallDAV. User/group must have granted access

Supported. Has to be set folder specific per user/group

Quota

User/group quota

Global and user/group override

 

Other connection advantages

SNMP

Yes

Yes + MIB

System expandable (apps)

Yes, check manufacturers website for most recent list

Yes, check manufacturers website for most recent list

Web server virtual host

Yes

Yes

Cloud NAS solution

Yes, sharing services only

Yes, sharing services and administration

 

The difference between the QNAP approach compared to Synology’s, is that QNAP sells the units with the OS already preinstalled and a wide range of additional feature packages (like VPN, Virus protection,…) are available to be activated at first run. The QNAP approach here is to give the end-user as much features out of the box, they tend to support all major network protocols and software vendors, an example would be: their VPN service allows you to set up everything on the NAS unit, afterwards you can just download an OpenVPN configuration file to be directly used after installing the OpenVPN client on your own/partner’s remote PC or Mac (or Linux).

Synology however, has roughly the same features, yet they opt the manual OS install approach (giving a certain amount of freedom of choice to which version of the DSM they wish to install). This approach of allowing users to choose which packages they prefer to install and which not; gives them an impression of keeping the unit run “light” on packages when they are sure they have no usage for certain features, yet have the choice to install them when their corporate needs change.

 

Optional free apps availabile

Synology

QNAP

Antivirus Essential

AjaXplorer

Cloud Station

Asterisk (IP Phone)

DHCP Server

eyeOS

Directory Server (LDAP)

GLPI

HiDRIVE Backup

Gallery

Mailstation

ICEstation

Time Backup

iStat

VPN Server

Java Runtime Environment

Syslog Server

MLDonkey (P2P)

Drupal

NZBGet (Newsgroups)

Joomla

Joomla

WordPress

Mono (ASP.NET FW)

Magento

Optware IPKG

MediaWiki

PiWik

Moodle

PLEX Media Server (Home theatre)

Python

PS3 Media Server

Logitech Media Server

pyLoad (DL manager)

SugarCRM

QiTunesAir (airport express)

WebAlizer

Python

osCommerce

QUSBCam (USB webcam)

phpBB

SABnzbdplus (Newsgroups)

OSTicket

SqueezeBox Server

PHPmyAdmin

PHPmyAdmin

Squid (Proxy)

Tappin (GlobalScape)

Tomcat JSP

Transmission (Magnet/Torrent)

Twonkymedia

Vtiger CRM

WordPress

Xmail (Internet mail/SMTP)

XOOPS (WebCM)

XEAMS (Internet mail/SMTP)

When we talk about additional packages its clear QNAP has the upper hand in choice. Still, Synology has a very nice application called “Time Backup”, an app that lets you work with versioning (Apple users can compare this with time machine in OSX).

QNAP has been aiming to get as many developers to jump their bandwagon to supply plenty of new DLNA, content sharing, programming framework and download clients and standards currently only associated with more powerful servers. Very interesting here for both advanced home users as business users is the Asterisk server, allowing you to set up your own IP-telephony setup. Another cracking feature in camp QNAP is being able to run ASP.NET code via their Mono app.

 

Deleting files, and undeleting

QNAP’s system takes a different approach than Synology does. After deleting a file or folder, QNAP creates a visible new folder with a special name like this example: “342NX5~B”. You can still see your deleted file names here, even if the option network recycle bin was not activated. You cannot open them, yet I do imagine they can be restored via PhotoRec, a fairly complex process requiring Linux and proper networking knowledge.  The annoying part about QNAP is that these files are still there and for some users might be visually intrusive, Synology on the other hand hides the deleted content immediately. Both units do feature network recycle bins, an option highly recommended to activate since it will save you a lot of time recovering a file compared to the manual EXT4, PhotoRec or R-Studio method. QNAP can auto hide a deleted folder when you enable “hide folder” from the network recycle bin property (even if it’s not activated, the network recycle bin will still show up as a folder).

 

Speed & performance

We are providing you with a simple table of file read/write actions we performed and which represents a more real world model of what users actually do with their NAS devices. Additionally we decided to give ATTO a spin, as this test gives a better impression when these units are used for VM/Citrix deployment.

Description:

  1. A set of 100 HQ JPEG photos in folder
  2. A bulk of 1000 itunes audio files
  3. A 4GB folder containing mixed small files and folders
  4. A 8GB single file archive
  5. A 35GB folder with 10*3.5GB files inside
  6. An 800MB single file archive
  7. A 350MB episode

 

Synology DiskStation DS412+ Copy from NAS in MB/sec AVG – PEAK Write to NAS in MB/Sec  AVG – PEAK
1 (100 JPEG) 70 – 110 40 – 60
2 (1000 MP3) 70 – 83 45 – 80
3 (4GB Folder) 60 – 116 60 – 108
4 (8GB Archive) 100 – 118 90 – 110
5 (35GB Folder) 115 – 118 95 – 109
6 (800MB File) 115 – 118 90 – 104
7 (350MB File) 115 – 118 104 -111
ATTO record R5 61 write, 81 read at 8Mb

 

QNAP TS-4469 Pro Copy from NAS in MB/sec AVG – PEAK Write to NAS in MB/Sec AVG – PEAK
1 (100 JPEG) 75 – 108 65 – 77
2 (1000 MP3) 65 – 79 55 – 86
3 (4GB Folder) 65 – 114 85 – 104
4 (8GB Archive) 115 – 118 96 – 107
5 (35GB Folder) 115 – 118 97 – 109
6 (800MB File) 115 – 118 95 – 104
7 (350MB File) 115 – 118 95 – 103
ATTO record R5 65 write, 86 read at 8Mb

Default network cables supplied by the manufacturer have been used for testing.

Note that the ATTO records are relative. They represent roughly the average speed of the 1000 MP3 test (where most individual files are on average 8Mb).

 

Strange behavior

With QNAP’s product we found the menu system to be dodgy on OSX. To give an example (we use Firefox): You have an item called “overview”, below that you have a list of folders in a tree menu ( Sys Administration, Disk Management, etc…). Now when you click one of these folders, a list of sub-tree items shows up (in Disk Management this would be: Volume management, Raid management, HDD SMART, etc…). Logic would expect you to see the sub-tree items as larger icons in the right pane. Not happening! Yet when you click the root folder (ex. Disk management) again, nothing happens. But… click one of the sub-items in the tree menu and then click the root folder a 2nd time, and it does show you the right pane large icon menu.

Aside from this, when you click the top level item “overview” after you clicked on a root folder, it doesn’t work. First you have to click on any item inside the root folder before, and then you can click “overview” and will actually see the first “splash” screen of the admin interface again. Strange logic.

Another poke-me-with-a-stick moment was after discovering that the Access rights management has an item called “Share folders”. Now inside you have a folder called Multimedia. Apparently there should have been 2 folders inside with few files who were not visible (even after unlocking the AFP for Macs) native on our Lion OS. So we logged on to the web file manager where the roots showed us there were subfolders (the + sign next to them), no subfolders when you clicked it and magically the + sign disappeared.

 

Now, this was odd, but not odd enough it seemed. We went back to the admin panel to double check about the files/folders inside Multimedia…  and the amount of folders and files had increased. This required staring pointlessly to screen for about 3 minutes thinking WTF, and continuing to log on to the web file manager multiple times and returning to check the Admin panel again. In the end we have 1.18Mb of data in 9 folders spread over 15files…  none of which we created or have ever physically seen with our own eyes. Under Windows these 2 original folders are however visible.

Synology’s overhauled DSM v4 didn’t give us any quirks when usability testing.

 

Note that the green tea we consumed was perfectly fine, we didn’t drink alcohol during testing, and the mushroom soup we had for dinner appeared to be absolutely legit. Just in case you were wondering.

 

Solving the problem

Since it was quite clear the QNAP unit wasn’t supposed to be born this way, we checked in with QNAP Support. The support team tested in their labs and told me: “I’ve checked internally and accessing the NAS with Mac should not be adding hidden files every time. There might be something wrong with the NAS system or the environment. Is it possible to check if a clean system still results this issue? http://wiki.qnap.com/wiki/Complete_Reinitialization”.

So we gave it a go and follow the procedure as described in their link. This “complete reinitialization” is in fact a bit like bleaching the entire premises, all data will be cleared and in essence you’re getting a brand new start with the software manager. And so we did, revealing that on our dominantly-Apple testing pattern, the unit seemed to operate perfectly fine this time.

As said before, this was an odd error. Thanks go out to QNAP’s support for getting this issue sorted.

 

The verdict

Now this has probably one of the hardest verdicts in our review history. For the simple fact both these units scored extremely well. So we had to split our judgment in different SMB deployment situations.

 

Where speed, access times and heavy load is mandatory: QNAP TS469 Pro

The QNAP TS469 Pro dominates in speed when working with smaller files, no question about it. Read, write and access times are an SMB’s dream and we have to give it to QNAP that performance wise this unit is a killer.

 

Where accessibility & virtualization is the prior reason of purchase: QNAP TS469 Pro

A difficult choice to take a pick here; Synology has the advantage of setting up iSCSI LUN’s and other virtualization options with an easier approach and “getting things done” is usually faster. The reason why QNAP tops here is simply because the performance of accessing the VM’s is partially dictated by the previously mentioned R/W/A timings; giving this unit a speed gain over the DS412+.

 

Where cost efficiency is key: Synology DS412+

It might be a slightly slower performer with small file sizes, but for your average SMB the cost of ownership is a factor to be considered. Synology has an excellent feature packed NAS unit for a price few competitors can beat.

Noteworthy to add that plenty of design/graphic studio’s are generally working with rather big file sizes, if this is your business then I would definitely not walk past the DS412+.

 

Where silent operation is an important consideration: Synology DS412+

No doubt! The DS412+ is a darling to have in close proximity (in the same room). The 2x 92mm fans take care of plenty of airflow while keeping the noise to a bare minimum. Actually, the 92mm fans are user replaceable by removing 8 screws at the back of the unit. So you can retrofit them with an even more silent fan model if you wish to crack down on noise completely.

 

In the end both units show a different target side of the SMB segment. Feature wise they are both packed like trade route horses. Hardware wise there is the number of IO options that can differentiate them based on actual SMB needs. A last point to consider: if you have an IT team present, the QNAP TS-469+ will be an excellent device for them to install. If you do not have an IT team present, and the goal is to try to configure everything yourself; then the Synology DS412+ offers the benefit of having a lower learning curve, where QNAP definitely requires previous networking experience (or the will to learn).

 

Category Review Storage
              
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.[REVIEW] Synology DS412+ versus QNAP TS-469 Pro, battle for the SMB segment.
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Comments
 

  • Not Fair

    synology latest firmware is DSM4.1 and it supports Vmware ESX5 VAAI. you can take a read on it, it will blows QNAP (and others, including most synology, as the support for this feature is very limited to a few models) to the end of the world simply because it is not supported.

 

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