Published on November 4th,2011 at 8:48 AM
By >Ike

[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers

Last month Kingston sent us a review sample of the Kingston SSDNOW V100+ series, to be specific we got hold of the 128GB edition. Kingston proclaims this SSD to be “The ultimate upgrade” for any PC user who wants to benefit from a significant speed gain without having to break the bank.

Admittedly the SSDNOW V100+ series isn’t one of the most recent, neither one of their fastest. Yet this drive is absolutely not outdated and deserves a bit more spotlight than it’s currently getting.
Ok.. You will probably say “Why don’t you write about the HyperX SSDs ? They’re currently one of the fastest drives out there.”  I tell you: “Indeed, I will hold that HyperX for another time, today we’ll be focusing on something every consumer out there might interest. A reliable product without the high price tag usually associated with SSD”.

 

Inside the box

In contrary to most SSDs we got our hands on, the Kingston SSDNOW V100+ comes in quite a pretty package. Money seemed to be no expense to deliver an appealing quality package.

The outside box features the necessary information with an outset illustration making it a box that will catch your eye faster than most of the other SSD boxes on shelf. Inside, Kingston opted to be eco-friendly by using a recyclable egg carton material. The SSD itself is well kept in place, and all the brackets & cables keep everything solidly in place.

  • Contents of the box:
  • A bracket to make it fit a 3,5 inch bay
  • 1x Molex to SATA power cable
  • 1x SATA data cable
  • Installation CD (usually will be automatically detected by your OS)
  • 1x 2,5 inch enclosure in PVC
  •  1x USB2.0 (Regular to Mini)
  • Some screws

 

I was surprised to see how Kingston actually thought about the fact that both desktop PC and laptop owners will purchase this product, thus coming up with the marvelous idea to add an external enclosure to the kit. Most notebooks don’t feature the option to house 2 hard disks/SSDs inside, so this makes a perfect add-on to house your old hard drive and give it a second life as a data storage or backup disk.

 

Logic board, fish and chips

We are going to be quite short on the chips part and move on to the fish, as we all know most consumers don’t give a blind **** about what chip they used inside. When it functions properly & gives them the speed boost & reliability, it’s all good.

Still, just for the record: the SSDNOW V100+ was built on the JMicron JMF618 controller hooked up to 128 GB of Toshiba’s 32Nm MLC dies, resulting in a very reliable drive with a solid TRIM features (garbage collection) to avoid the MLC degrading in speed.

TRIM is in essence just a command name that’s OS independent, it tells the controller which files are marked as deleted. Afterwards the garbage collection action performed by the controller will list these sectors as “free to overwrite”. Very simply put it’s a very effective way to avoid the sectors to be unnecessary overwritten to notify your OS that it is empty space. It’s not the same as defragmentation, more a way of efficient reallocation of resources to assure fast operation.

The SSDNOW V100+ is a combined Taiwanese/Japanese product. All the inside parts come from reliable names in the game such as Toshiba (JP) and JMicron (TW). Assembly of the enclosure is done in China, the SSD itself is produced in Japan.

 

Got speed?

We tested this drive only with ATTO, since this program still is by far one of the most reliable benchmarking tools and widely accepted as a standard in speed measurement.

Our test results are based on an incremental sized algorithm that writes and reads first small blocks of data to the drive, after completion of the first block it increments the size it wrote the previous time and rewrites a bigger block, etc..  until it reaches the maximum block size you gave in (most commonly from 0.5KB to 8GB).

Windows 7 x64 ATTO:

  • Maximum speed in WRITE:  188,596MB per second on a 512MB file.
  • Maximum speed in READ: 206,488MB per second on a 512MB file.

Connected as a USB3.0 peripheral ATTO:

  • Maximum speed in WRITE:  188,155MB per second on a 512MB file.
  • Maximum speed in READ: 204,896MB per second on a 128MB file.

 

Screenshot 0013 shows the results of ATTO running native on SATA, screenshot 0014 shows the result of ATTO when the drive was connected over USB3.0. There are small changes over USB3.0, the drive seems to get an instant boost from the very smallest of blocks it writes away, not surprising since its used as an external storage medium without native OS running on it, whereas the first screenshot is actually natively running an OS + ATTO. In the end the maximum speeds are fairly similar so there is no ‘best way’ of using this SSD.

 

Pricing & final word

The SSDNOW V100+ 128GB retails (at the time this review was posted) in the 160/250€ (around 250$) zone. You might want to search online a bit before purchasing as these SSD prices fluctuate.

Most users will use it as a boot device and benefit from a nice speed boost up to 2x the speed of their current desktop/laptop. For booting your OS an SSD is a no-brainer purchase, you just have to get one if you want your PC, Mac or Linux device to boot up much faster than what you were use to on hard disk. When intended to be used strictly for external storage you’re still better off in terms of price with a 7200RPM 2,5inch SATA disk, but then again very few users are purchasing SSDs to be used as external flash drives.

Overall I dare say this SSD is a very good deal, combining speed and reliability in a very fair priced package with bonus content no other manufacturer provides.

 

Category Review
              
[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers
[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers
[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers[REVIEW] Kingston SSDNOW V100+; quality & reliability comes to budget buyers
Related Articles


 

0

[REVIEW] Datacolor Spyder 3 Elite, your desk goes pro studio

0

RIBA II Care Support Robot For Lifting Patients

Comments
 

  • TooLittleTooLate

    The pricing for these things is so off, I still don’t know how they are selling so well. Until they (or a similar/better technology) are at the very least 4 times cheaper, I for once am not in the list to buy one anytime soon. Raid with magnetic media it’s for me for a long time.

    • AaronD12

      I recently got a 160GB Intel SSD for $120 online. It was a MAJOR speed boost to my MacBook Pro. Pricing is there if you look for it closely…

    • Anonymous

      Same for me, but with a Crucial M4 (256GB)… It won’t replace my I7 into a Sandy Bridge I7, but WOW, the speed an SSD gave to a PC is impressive!

    • TooLittleTooLate

      160GB is waaayyy too little. The most I would consider is a $199 SSD 512GB drive, but I don’t think it will happen with Flash, perhaps some other solid state memory. Wondering how practical it could be a low power battery backed RAM drive for speed-up as a boot drive. With today low reliability (for both, SSD and magnetic HD … if they break, you’re screwed) backups and necessary anyway, so a RAM drive (with dual batteries) is not all that “scary”. My 1TB boot drive is always freaking full. I won’t mention the 2TB and 3TB data and temporary raids arrays.

  • https://rally.org/NewHiTechCompany [] The New HighTech Company []

    SSDs are quickly becoming bigger and cheaper

  • Sbsk2000

    this site is dead

    • Anonymous

      Yep, I am sorry for that, a lot of things have change since September… BUT it will be back alive soon with MUCH more news than before, just be a little bit more patient.

  • Ogawa

    reliability? how they can prove this? SSD are getting bigger making it failing more.

  • LoneRanger

    Your article is incorrect. This drive and all SSDNow V100+ drives use the Toshiba T6UG1XBG. A very different beast than the JMicron JMF618. These are some of, if not the best, drives to use for RAID arrays, because of their aggressive “garbage collection”.

 

0

Panasonic - Massager that relaxes your muscles and warms them gently

1

World's lightest and thinnest circuits pave the way for 'imperceptible electronics'

0

Panasonic - Smartphone-sized portable full body massager

0

Nestlé - KitKat - 2013 summer seasonal special flavors

0

Turn your iPhone 4/4s or 5 into a real pocket camcorder thanks to Donya

0

Japanese Technology from the Future Friday!

0

LG - Pink-colored model will be added to Pocket photo

3

Sharp - Electronic handwriting notebook that can save 2000 pages data

0

LG - Ultra-wide LCD monitor with a cinematic 21:9 aspect ratio

0

Panasonic – DMC-XS3 – Slim & classic designed Lumix camera

0

Panasonic - DMC-FZ70 - Lumix camera with the world's first 60X optical zoom

0

Japanese Robots: The Seemingly Least Cool Robotics Story of July is a Must-Read!

1

Sony - α58 - DSLR camera with interchangeable lenses

0

Thanko - 7.5mm biz card sized portable battery - Increased in battery capacity by 1200mAh over the previous model

0

JVC Kenwood - ADIXXION "GC-XA2" - dustproof, shockproof, waterproof, low-temperature resistant action camera

0

NTT docomo - Disney Mobile on docomo F-07E - Disney official smartphone